Transferring facing a dangerous situation into your writing

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storysinger
Posts: 783
Joined: Tue Jul 30, 2013 1:00 pm
Location: Pensacola

Transferring facing a dangerous situation into your writing

Postby storysinger » Tue Oct 09, 2018 3:08 pm

As I sit here tonight hurricane Michael has a bullseye targeted on Pensacola. The Weather Channel tells me it will turn away. Do I stay or do I run?

This is at a minimum my sixth active hurricane. When I was younger I would jog through the high winds enjoying every minute of the experience.

In the near future I will write a story that incorporates living on the edge of danger. Do you have a story to tell?

Running from a volcano? Tornado? Gunfire? What's your story?
HM-1
Today's science fiction is tomorrow's reality.
D.R.Sweeney

storysinger
Posts: 783
Joined: Tue Jul 30, 2013 1:00 pm
Location: Pensacola

Re: Transferring facing a dangerous situation into your writing

Postby storysinger » Tue Oct 09, 2018 3:40 pm

In 1995 hurricane Erin hit the Florida panhandle with 100 mph winds. When the storm arrived I laced up my favorite shoes and ran into the storm.
I was instantly soaked to the skin by the force of the wind being blown sideways leaving little red dots where each drop striking me made it look like I had a bad case of the measles.
Two thirds of the way through my run I saw a carport cover close to being separated from its support. I ran across the street and stood beneath a juniper tree with a trunk about a foot thick affording me shelter from the winds. The aluminum cover was holding on by the last row of screws and flapping like a towel in the wind. My thought was to see it seperate and go flying down the street.
Peeking around the tree trunk I saw a miniature tornado form and go twisting down the middle of the street. It occurred to me that the momma tornado might be along soon so I lit out for the house for some shelter from the storm.
The shoes I wore for my adventure were completely destroyed but what a thrill it was.
HM-1
Today's science fiction is tomorrow's reality.
D.R.Sweeney

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orbivillein
Posts: 178
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2015 4:37 pm
Location: Anatoll

Re: Transferring facing a dangerous situation into your writing

Postby orbivillein » Tue Oct 09, 2018 4:10 pm

My top hurricane motif chuckle is that weather-news bureaus send out storm-naive correspondents to cover on-scene events. Send those who don't know so their emotions are genuine and high strength, so the public gets the message that hurricanes are not to be taken lightly.

Been through dozens of hurricanes myself, evacuated once, and the shelter was damaged, home, not at all. Surfed in a category 1 hurricane, 80 mph winds, once, a dozen lines of twelve-foot combers out to the outer most deep-water bar. Worst hurricane so far, 140 mph winds, category 4, September 9, 1960 landfall, Key West, Donna, home not damaged at all. A dozen or more category 2s, a few category 3s, several 4s, multiple category 1s, surely several more to transpire near future.

Otherwise, a hurricane event, to me, represents Nature's capacity to lay low human hubris; that is, despite human efforts to tame Nature, Nature will not suffer it. An individual and Nature generic theme. More specific, Nature completes an individual's maturation growth, begun by family and society.

Spiraledpen
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:04 pm

Re: Transferring facing a dangerous situation into your writing

Postby Spiraledpen » Tue Oct 09, 2018 4:28 pm

In my past, I was on a flight deck of a particular aircraft carrier. My assignment was with an A-6 VA group and I was with the alert attack aircraft. We were starting up the plane for a readiness testing routine when the flight deck atmosphere suddenly changed.
Only someone with expeience on a flight deck would have noticed without looking around. There are changes in the way the rythum of activity shifts. The sounds settled around us and we looked to the Chief on deck for answers. He gave us the hold symbol. Then I noticed that all of the active planes on deck were holding position. Flights had been suspended. We stood there with jet exhaust rolling over our our bodies. We held our positions and waited. Even with all those engines roaring, One could sense that you could hear a pin drop.
Suddenly the ordinance elevators opened and live ordinance sat racked up and waiting the AO’s moved in and in one coordinated move, dispersed to every plane that was running. Everyone knew that instant that something serious was happening...

The energy of that moment had an intensity that I have never felt before. To add the essence of that moment in s story can breathe an element that can not be ignored.

Nice question storysinger! Reminds us of ways to use life to embue energy into the words we pen.

Spiraledpen

wotf009
Last edited by Spiraledpen on Wed Oct 10, 2018 1:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Truth is a three edged sword.

Kosh, B5

kentagions
Posts: 306
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2015 2:45 pm
Location: Saint Paul, Minnesota

Re: Transferring facing a dangerous situation into your writing

Postby kentagions » Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:46 am

My best friend and I used to rock climb at his ranch in the Colorado Rockies. We climbed without ropes, harnesses, climbing shoes or helmets, technical equipment that we couldn't afford in high school. Our equipment consisted of T-shirts, blue jeans and hiking boots. One day, he wanted to climb a one hundred foot cliff face I had always been reluctant to try. He insisted. We had to do it.

I was bigger and stronger than him. My nickname at my landscaping job was The Hulk, so I wouldn't wimp out on my best friend.

A good chimney and well-placed fissures in the rock afforded us hand and footholds enough to get to a large overhang. A cave in the overhang ended fifteen feet from the top, but exited over a thirty foot drop onto a steep granite incline with jagged boulders at the bottom. To go up meant negotiating eight feet of layback transitioning to seven feet of tight finger jambs and toe holds and then a ledge at the top.

While I negotiated my surrender, intending to go back the way we came, my best friend admitted his extreme fear of climbing downward. We had to climb up or he'd be stranded. We also knew that there was no way that my friend had the hand strength to make the rest of the climb. I would have to make the climb and then we could tie our belts together with a waist pack for a makeshift rope he could tie around one hand for safety.

Laybacks take a lot of energy, pushing with legs while clinging hand-over-hand up a narrow fissure. The rock to push against quickly flattened out leaving only a narrowing fissure to grip. Still seven feet from the top, I slipped hands into the crack and flexed them and wedged boots into the wider part of the fissure below. Any slip would kill me. My arm muscles burned with the exertion. My lungs were on fire, trying to pump enough thin Colorado air into my system to allow me to inch upward.

Rough granite ground my knuckles down until they bled, which forced me to grip harder to counter the slickness of the blood. The fissure narrowed until only fingertips would fit. With two more agonizing feet to climb, the fissure near my feet closed enough that I could no longer wedge a toe into it.

About that time, things got complicated.
Kent

Spiraledpen
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2018 4:04 pm

Re: Transferring facing a dangerous situation into your writing

Postby Spiraledpen » Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:52 am

Two thumbs up!

(As long as you still have thumbs!). ; )
Truth is a three edged sword.

Kosh, B5


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