Wulf Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Open topics on the Contest itself, to include results-watch threads and other items of note.
oishisushi911
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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby oishisushi911 » Mon Nov 11, 2019 6:49 am

Wulf Moon wrote:Retro wrote:
Retropianoplayer wrote:I won't give a detailed critique, but only a short overview of those words she feels are clunky and troubling: (not in alphabetical order)

Actually / Currently / So
Basically / Now / There/Here
Practically / Was / Things
Simply / Were
Truly / Very
Virtually / Only
Almost / Currently
Nearly / Probably
Appeared / Quite
Seemed / Rather
Get/Got / Somewhat
Just / Somehow
That / Begin/Began
Then / Sort of/Kind of/A Little


Thanks for the list. I can sum up most of these in two words: indecisive writing.


I was going back through the posts to see what I had missed or failed to respond to, and I wanted to mention something about this one. In the going on 20 stories I've rejected for Deep Magic so far, I passed on several due to such words above. I even sat on the stories over the weekend after being hesitant upon my first read. By the end, when I came back, hoping I would realize they were better than I thought, I realized they just were not the excellence Deep Magic was seeking. And some of them, it came down to reading this indecisive writing, where I started to wonder whether I was in an essay world, where everyone had to introduce every sentence carefully, or if I was stuck in a world of people emphasizing everything with plenty of gestures and meaningless talk. It was frustrating, because there were good stories lost in there.

The point here is about avoiding the extra words mentioned above, the indecisive writing, but I wanted to further emphasize that the reason why these words caused the story to be a turnof is that they pushed me out of my attempt to engage and deeply immerse myself in the story. I know I've used this kind of language at times, thinking it was portraying the attitude or personality of the character, but it ended up killing the story.

Hope my thoughts on this help some and it helps you reach past the slush.
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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby officer » Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:02 am

oishisushi911 wrote:I know I've used this kind of language at times, thinking it was portraying the attitude or personality of the character, but it ended up killing the story.

Thanks for the insight! How do you feel about such language in dialogue? I agree it's distracting in narration (even in first person).

I examine all my adverbs. If there's a more accurate verb to replace both verb and adverb, I do that. There often is. English has a lot of verbs! If removing the adverb sounds no worse and doesn't harm the meaning, I do so. Otherwise, I keep it. For dialogue, I've experimented with also keeping "neutral" adverbs in one character's speech, to help distinguish his voice from others'. TBD if this is a good idea... that's why I'm asking!

Sensory verbs (seem/appear/sound/feel/smell/taste/etc) are hardest for me to eliminate. I've found thinking about the observations or feelings as the subject, rather than the POV character, helps me (re)write stronger sentences. Using these words distances the reader from the observation. Although it's more accurate to say something "seems" a certain way (especially if the POV character is mistaken), that it's a character's perspective is already implied (even in third person). Such precision breaks immersion.

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Wulf Moon » Mon Nov 11, 2019 1:36 pm

Thanks for the screen shot, Peter Glen. I enjoyed seeing WulfPack as the header. : ) Glad the Secrets and the exercises have been helping. More to come! This is the advanced class!

RJK Lee, glad you enjoyed the prompt. You can study no greater prose than in Bradbury's works--his writing evoked strong emotion and unique sensory detail in every phrase. Reading Bradbury is to stand with one foot in prose, one foot in poetry. He created his own dimension, as all great writers do.

Thanks for sharing your slush culls. To our challenge beasties, look closely at that. RJK Lee is new to slush reading, so he took extra time and extra reads to make sure he hadn't messed up on what appeared to be great stories. In the end, great stories didn't matter if they weren't executed properly. He had to toss them before they ever got to the board of directors that do the final choosing at DEEP MAGIC. You will not get this much time with first reader Kary in WotF. So pay attention to all these details we've been talking about. Great ideas are meaningless if you fail to execute them with finesse.

My Kill Your Darlings exercises? If you do them regularly, and you do them properly, you will learn how to instinctively cull weak prose and weak dialogue. Flash is a great way to learn how to write streamlined stories. Master flash, master vignettes, and you will master scenes. A story is simply linked scenes of escalating tension leading up to the grand climax where your protagonist hopes to get what they desire.

Thanks for sharing! I should have the cover letters Secret done today. Stay tuned!

All the beast,

Beastmaster Moon
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Henckel » Mon Nov 11, 2019 3:41 pm

officer wrote:How do you feel about such language in dialogue?

Personally, I try to maintain a tight narrative and remove as many "filler word" as possible in the editing stage. But, when it comes to dialogue, I'll often leave these "filler words" in because they are a part of character voice.
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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Retropianoplayer » Mon Nov 11, 2019 5:06 pm

Officer, in answer to your query, I pulled out my trusty old The Screenwriter's Bible by David Trottier (I realize he refers to dialogue in screenplays, not short stories).

From Page 87 of his 442-page book, he states: "Dialogue should also move the story forward, just as scenes do, and reveal something about the character's attitudes, perceptions, traits and values. When there's sufficient intention behind a speech, the speech is an action. Every dialogue scene should involve some conflict, even if it is just passive resistance. Back and forth, like a contest or competition....Movie dialogue should snap, crackle and pop. Snap is the crispness of the dialogue. . . Crackle is the freshness of the dialogue. Which speech is better? Young lady, you're definitely pregnant or No doubt about it, Mama Bear, your eggo is prego.

"Pop is the subtext. Subtext is what's under the text. It's what's between the lines, the emotional content of the words, what's really meant. Dialogue is like an iceberg. The text is the visible part. The subtext is below. The text implies the subtext lying below. Audiences seldom want to see the whole block of ice. Likewise, your characters should seldom say exactly what they feel. When an actor wants to know her motivation in a scene, she wants to understand the emotions going on within the character. She wants to know the subtext."

Hope this helps, Officer. The disclaimer being that Author David Trottier is not a WOTF Judge , nor has ever judged their contests.

Best,

Retro

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby oishisushi911 » Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:35 pm

officer wrote:
oishisushi911 wrote:How do you feel about such language in dialogue? I agree it's distracting in narration (even in first person).

I examine all my adverbs. If there's a more accurate verb to replace both verb and adverb, I do that. There often is. English has a lot of verbs! If removing the adverb sounds no worse and doesn't harm the meaning, I do so. Otherwise, I keep it. For dialogue, I've experimented with also keeping "neutral" adverbs in one character's speech, to help distinguish his voice from others'. TBD if this is a good idea... that's why I'm asking!

Sensory verbs (seem/appear/sound/feel/smell/taste/etc) are hardest for me to eliminate. I've found thinking about the observations or feelings as the subject, rather than the POV character, helps me (re)write stronger sentences. Using these words distances the reader from the observation. Although it's more accurate to say something "seems" a certain way (especially if the POV character is mistaken), that it's a character's perspective is already implied (even in third person). Such precision breaks immersion.


I generally feel the same about first person narration and dialogue, since they both are channeled through the distinctive voice of the character in question. I think that it’s important to pick a few distinguishing manners of speech or particular word choice for the character, but not overdo it. Use repetition if that’s how the character would speak but not to the point that they sound fake. Use adverbs or fillers, if the character would do so (reading our work as per Wulf’s recent assignment being the best way to sort this out), but only as needed to sketch out the character for the reader, not to the point the reader pauses to roll their eyes in exasperation. I’ve found on reading some of my work that I love creating a really strong voice but may be overdoing the portrayal—that said, I’m going to go over my work again this week and reflect on this.

My belief is that less is often more as has been said about other aspects of writing. A few select characteristics, whether we’re talking description or speech and first person narration often portray volumes more than the possible overkill of laying too much on for the reader.
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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Wulf Moon » Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:42 pm

Moon’s SUPER SECRET #38: Cover Letters--How You Dress to Kill
Copyright 2019 by Wulf Moon

You’re a good mama, a good papa. You’ve unchained your baby kraken, brought him topside, dressed him in the best purple prose money can buy. That white sailor’s cap with the flowing pink feather is the perfect accessory to his ensemble, and who wouldn’t think he’s adorable in those platform shoes that make him look ten feet tall. You pimp him up with a set of gold chains around his neck that would make Mr. T green with envy. There! Your little kraken is dressed to kill.

But wait! Wouldn’t it be smart to have a crier go before him, you know, to give your baby kraken a fearsome introduction to wake and shake the captain of the ship he’s about to take on? If it worked for Heath Ledger in KNIGHT’S TALE, surely it will work for your spawn, at least until he gets his little sea legs under him. So you hire the best--Geoffrey Chaucer--to flower things up a bit.

“Hear ye! Fear ye! The mighty kraken Ugg the Malevolent from the Black Sea approaches! His mother says he’s the greatest baby kraken the world has ever seen! His third-grade ballet teacher--who studied at Julliard, no less--said this kraken was destined for great things! He’s the kraken that spit ink in Blackbeard’s eye--not once, not twice, but thrice!--and he took a splinter out of Queen Anne’s Revenge’s hull with his own pointy head! This kraken is krak-a-lakken, and he comes for you in all his pimpalicious glory! Fear, fear, fear for your lives!”

With introductions made, baby kraken hops onto the deck, shakes off purple cloak and a few platform shoes, lifts those suction-tipped tentacles and squeaks, “Rawr?”

When we send out our stories, cover letters are like criers--they make proclamations. They tell the editor where to send the contract (and money!), they state the title of our baby kraken, what genre, what size, and then they share his pedigree. Cover letters present your story to the editor, along with a few pertinent credentials if you have them. At quick glance, an editor should be able to tell from your cover letter how much space she will have to dedicate for it in her publication if she buys it (word count) and if your story is in the genre they seek. They should also be able to tell if you’re an aspiring writer, or an established writer. Cover letters are the quick reference first readers and editors use to determine what’s inside the box, so to speak.

You’ve heard the saying less is more. Nowhere is this truer than in professional cover letters. Novices believe they need to flower things up, stretch the truth, inflate achievements, gild the lily. Fancier fonts might get an editor’s attention, so they submit it in Brush Script. A personal reference sounds nice, so they tell the editor how their mother, grandmother, teacher, and priest all read this story and wept with joy for the blessings to come to humanity. Some promise the editor this will be the greatest story they have ever published and will make them millions! And last but not least, some even threaten the editor, stating with absolute certainty that this will be the biggest mistake of the editor’s career if he lets this story slip through his fingers, and if the editor dares reject it, they’ll hunt him down like a duck, and close with lots of threatening words that rhyme with duck.

DON’T BE THAT GUY! Okay, you’re a SUPER SECRETS challenge beastie. We take it for granted you know better. Still, the question remains: How does one write a good cover letter? What do they look like? What’s good to put in them? What’s best to leave out?

Good cover letters are plain, clear, and simple. Like Sergeant Friday always said in DRAGNET, “Just the facts, ma’am.” A cover letter states to the editor who you are, how to contact you, what you’ve sent them, and what you’ve had published that might indicate professional status. Hey, they’re looking to buy the best--if you’ve sold to some of the best, it’s a good sign, and most want to know. Not all, but most. Think of cover letters as an index card editors will use for quick reference on the details pertinent to you and your story.

So what does a professional cover letter look like? Here, let me show you a sample:

_____________________________________

Wulf Moon
Mount Olympus
Email: moon at supersecrets.kraken
123-456-7891

Date

Respectable Market Publishing

Dear Editor (or Mr. or Ms. and their last name unless you have reasons to use their first name),

Please find attached my story, “Baby Kraken Gets Schooled,” (3100 words, fantasy) for your consideration.

My stories have appeared in Science World, Star Trek: Strange New Worlds 2, Writers of the Future Vol. 35, Future Science Fiction Digest, and Deep Magic.

In 2019, I won the Writers of the Future Contest and the Critters Readers’ Choice Award for Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Short Story of 2018.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Wulf Moon
____________________________


See? Short and sweet. Name, rank, and serial number. Do you see anything here about how great my baby kraken story is? About my high school teacher that raved over my writing skills? About why this editor would be a fool not to buy it? No. Just the facts, ma’am, and you won’t shoot yourself, and your baby kraken, in the foot.

What if you don’t have professional credits? Well, do you have semi-professional credits? List your top three, as long as they were paying, respectable markets. The point is, they should enhance your reputation, not detract from it. What if you have no publishing credits? That’s quite alright. Every famous writer you know began sending their early stories out with zero credits. There is no shame in that, and no one will look unfavorably on your manuscript if your cover letter lacks them. But if you do the other stuff in your cover letters, prepare for your baby kraken to die a most heinous death. Or worse, to be laughed at and made fun of by every captain he meets.

Give your baby kraken the chance to put his best foot forward. Dress him to kill. The fashion that’s vogue in the business of writing cover letters is ...understatement.

ASSIGNMENT:

Read Alex Shvartsman’s excellent article on cover letters (I work for him as podcast director at Future Science Fiction Digest). Here’s the link: https://alexshvartsman.com/2016/05/09/h ... er-letter/

NEXT: Please answer the following.

1. How can a cover letter actually hurt your chances to sell?

2. What are some of the most common mistakes in cover letters?

3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting?

4. When are you permitted to use an editor’s first name?

5. When only do you list educational degrees?

6. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?

7. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?

8. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?

9. Will listing non-paying or token markets impress an editor?

10. If we have many credits, should we list them all? What’s a good average that won’t overwhelm an editor’s tired eyes? (Yes, I exceeded this.
Like the Pirate's Code, they're more like guidelines.)

11. Finally, what do you feel is the number one rule about cover letters?

12. Finally finally. You have everything you need now to send your krakens out to sea. What are you waiting for? Get kraken! wotf007
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby oishisushi911 » Mon Nov 11, 2019 7:55 pm

Wulf Moon wrote:Thanks for sharing your slush culls. To our challenge beasties, look closely at that. RJK Lee is new to slush reading, so he took extra time and extra reads to make sure he hadn't messed up on what appeared to be great stories. In the end, great stories didn't matter if they weren't executed properly. He had to toss them before they ever got to the board of directors that do the final choosing at DEEP MAGIC. You will not get this much time with first reader Kary in WotF. So pay attention to all these details we've been talking about. Great ideas are meaningless if you fail to execute them with finesse.

I just wanted to affirm what Wulf has pointed out. You will not get much time to impress in the slush. I believe there’s only a few first readers, of the 20 working for Deep Magic, who would bother to read past the first page if it doesn’t grab them. About 1 in 20 stories, at the most, would be sent on to the second round by a first reader.

I asked everyone at Deep Magic and the advice was to reject the story directly if the opening has any issues whatsoever. If it has issues and really grabs a first reader, they’ll send it on to the second round, but any hiccups greatly reduce the chance of that happening.

To reach the second reading where the rest of the story will be given a chance, the opening has to sing perfectly true. We all know this, but seeing it as first reader is really hammering it in for me.
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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby officer » Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:03 pm

Thanks, Moon! I found that same site before and used it as a model. I'll let others answer the questions and instead paste the last one I sent out, for a flash piece via e-mail submission. Names changed to protect the innocent:


Dear [Editor],

I hope you enjoy my science fiction story "Title" (~900 words). Please find it attached.

Thank you for your consideration.

Cheers,
Ari

[E-mail address]
[Phone number]

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby SwiftPotato » Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:09 pm

1. How can a cover letter actually hurt your chances to sell?
If you put in lots of token/non-paying markets and self-congratulatory fluff, you might illicit (at best) some eyerolls from the editor.

2. What are some of the most common mistakes in cover letters?
Listing all your accomplishments like you're applying for a job, like where you went to school and what for, plus literally any and all experience you've ever had in this area. Maybe you've published twelve times in Unheard Of Magazine, but the editor would rather hear about one publication in F&SF than all of those twelve combined.
Summarizing your story.

3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting?
Yes, but it would be smart to look into the editor's actual name and use it if you can find it.

4. When are you permitted to use an editor’s first name?
If you've communicated with them before via email and they sign their first name, or they've stated a preference for it in the submission guidelines.

5. When only do you list educational degrees?
When they have some bearing on the story (like if you wrote about medicine in the future and you're a doctor).

6. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
Nope.

7. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
Extra nope, with a side of absolutely not.

8. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
Really, really extra no, ever, at all (unless they ask for it specifically).

9. Will listing non-paying or token markets impress an editor?
Also...nope.

10. If we have many credits, should we list them all? What’s a good average that won’t overwhelm an editor’s tired eyes? (Yes, I exceeded this.
Like the Pirate's Code, they're more like guidelines.)

No. About three is fine.

11. Finally, what do you feel is the number one rule about cover letters?
Keep it short, professional, and simple.

12. Finally finally. You have everything you need now to send your krakens out to sea. What are you waiting for?
The apocalypse, clearly. :)
R, 3rd place Q4 v36!!!

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Wulf Moon » Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:09 pm

RJK Lee...what you shared is incredibly helpful. I don't think many aspiring writers understand how little time you have to prove your story is worth the read. Sharing things like that really helps the group. The same is true for WotF. Thank you!

And if you guys want to read something adorable, please check out WotF's latest blog. It's by our very own challenge beastie, THE GIRL IN THE GLASSES!

All I can say is, this is why we write.

https://www.writersofthefuture.com/book ... n-dawdler/
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby AVDutson » Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:25 pm

I'm sorry I'm so behind on the Wulf Pack assignments. I have every intention of keeping up, although I know I haven't been posting like it. I have signed into The Submission Grinder (awesome I must say), started reading the cover letter article, and have read, Never Let Go ('Belief is a powerful thing,' got an immediate highlight.

But the main brunt of my writing time is currently going to rewrites. This is the first time I've EVER been ahead of my planned submissions and meeting deadlines with an awesome editor. It's such a rush that I'm reluctant to relinquish any of that time.

BUT . . . but.

A little knowledge has gotten me this far, and if I don't keep up, I'll miss other gems in Wulf's Pack.

So the question is, those of you working a day job 50+ hours a week, how do you schedule your writing time? How much time do you spend on the myriad activities that we HAVE to fit in? What tricks work best for you?
~Tony
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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby AVDutson » Mon Nov 11, 2019 10:05 pm

"Never Let Go" Assignment:

1. Why are amateur writing contests an excellent way to break into publishing?
In John Lithgow's memoir: Drama: An Actor's Education, he talked about taking any and every role for experience and also networking. Amature contests have the same benefits and level the playing field by only allowing beginning writers.
2. What benefits come from entering the Writers of the Future contest even if you do not win? (And we hope you do!)
Writing practice, meeting deadline practice, writing to audience practice, writing to spec guideline practice, and networking practice.
3. What might consistently getting honorable mentions in Writers of the Future indicate about our writing? When we start getting the higher honors, what does that indicate?
That we're beginning to produce quality work. Like 'Topanga Canyon,' we are CLOSE! Our writing is on the cusp of something 'more.'
4. Before George Mallory successfully climbed Mt. Everest, what did he do?
He climbed other mountains.
5. How do we scale new peaks with every story we write? If we keep training, what happens over time?
We keep trying to reach more than we've obtained. With each attempt, we better our skills.
6. If you haven't watched this video from Joni Labaqi already, please do so.

7. What's the concept behind the saying: "The first million words are practice?"
That until we have written that many words, we haven't gained the skills necessary to write quality work.
8. It's quite possible Jerry Pournelle coined this saying, and he said it alot (although some swear it was Heinlein, others Bradbury, and so on). In the video, did he say we have to write one million words before we'll sell a story to a professional market? What range did he list as a general rule where our stories might start hitting the professional mark? (His definition of professional being someone with the ability to publish that will pay us for our story.)
500k-1 million. He said we'd sell around that point.
9. While every writer's innate skills and learning levels vary, what's the takeaway from Mr. Pournelle?
Write stories and submit them. Only change them when suggested by editors.
10. Suppose a novice actor decides they're only going to audition for Broadway productions, nothing else. What is likely to happen?
They will NEVER succeed because the will never achieve the proficiency needed for Broadway productions.
11. Why might it be a good idea for that novice actor to audition at Off-Broadway productions as well?
Because they'll get a chance to practice their craft. John Lithgow's memoir talked about a time they performed their play for an audience of school children. He said that children are a BRUTAL audience. He left his first scene angry and frustrated because the kids didn't 'get' his performance. After a bit of thinking, he realized that they actually understood the play better than he did because they cut through the fluff of style and performance. They went to the story. When he went back out, he adjusted his performance—timing of lines and everything. He knew he had the role flawless when the kids were riveted.
12. Thinking of this illustration, if a new writer only sends their stories to the top SFWA approved markets and stops at the last SFWA approved market, what will they miss out on?
The readers who will enjoy their work.
13. How will targeting these semipro markets and writing to their specified themes improve your chances of a sale? What will be the case with the competition in these markets?
My chances will improve and my competition—the hobbyist writer—will thin.
14. Once you get your foot in the door with a publisher, what often happens?
It opens other doors because you are now a known commodity.
15. Are there any other advantages to selling a story to mid-level respectable markets, what I call Off-Broadway productions?
Yes. In many cases they are the farm teams leading to the major leagues. When people/editors like your work, you will get a callback!
16. Are there any drawbacks?
NO! Well, maybe smaller pay, but that changes with experience.
17. Do the benefits outweigh the risk?
Ten-fold.
18. If we're being realistic, if we're well below the 500,000 words mark in our writing, are we really risking much?
Nope. It never hurts to have eyes on it. You might get nothing, but eventually you might strike gold.
19. Psychologically, how might getting a decent sale and seeing our story in print--even thought it's not technically a pro market--help us stay in this marathon for the long haul?
Be cause we're being paid to write! I attended the LTUE writing conference and went to the self-publishing panel. I was amazed that these authors were often making more money than traditionally published authors. It had to be a mistake, but there were so many of them. When I came out of that panel, I realized the choice of success is often between fame and pay. Famous authors might not be paid as well, while authors hiding behind pen names make reliable six-figure incomes.
20. List one of Moon's "Lessons Learned" stated in the essay that could help you in your goal to become a professional writer.
Send out your stories. This is my greatest weakness. I write stories and submit them once. Why? Because I've had my heart set on winning Writers of the Future without doing everything it takes to succeed. I know my stories are good from the Honorable Mentions, so I need to be pushing them out the door. The worst that can happen is that I pro out like Keven J. Anderson. ;)
~Tony
A.V. Dutson
R : 2, HM : 2, SHM : 2, F : 0, SF : 0, W : 0

"You know what I did after I wrote my first novel? I shut up and wrote twenty-three more."
~Michael Connelly

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Henckel » Mon Nov 11, 2019 11:27 pm

oishisushi911 wrote:
Wulf Moon wrote:Thanks for sharing your slush culls. To our challenge beasties, look closely at that. RJK Lee is new to slush reading, so he took extra time and extra reads to make sure he hadn't messed up on what appeared to be great stories. In the end, great stories didn't matter if they weren't executed properly. He had to toss them before they ever got to the board of directors that do the final choosing at DEEP MAGIC. You will not get this much time with first reader Kary in WotF. So pay attention to all these details we've been talking about. Great ideas are meaningless if you fail to execute them with finesse.

I just wanted to affirm what Wulf has pointed out. You will not get much time to impress in the slush. I believe there’s only a few first readers, of the 20 working for Deep Magic, who would bother to read past the first page if it doesn’t grab them. About 1 in 20 stories, at the most, would be sent on to the second round by a first reader.

I asked everyone at Deep Magic and the advice was to reject the story directly if the opening has any issues whatsoever. If it has issues and really grabs a first reader, they’ll send it on to the second round, but any hiccups greatly reduce the chance of that happening.

To reach the second reading where the rest of the story will be given a chance, the opening has to sing perfectly true. We all know this, but seeing it as first reader is really hammering it in for me.


This little bit of information is a real gem. Thanks for sharing.
(2014) V31 Q1 – R
(2018) V35 Q3 – HM
(2019) V36 Q3 – HM
(2019) V36 Q4 – SHM
(2020) V37 Q1 – ?

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Henckel » Mon Nov 11, 2019 11:33 pm

Wulf Moon wrote:
And if you guys want to read something adorable, please check out WotF's latest blog. It's by our very own challenge beastie, THE GIRL IN THE GLASSES!

All I can say is, this is why we write.

https://www.writersofthefuture.com/book ... n-dawdler/


That's a lovely article: written by our own Girl-in-green-glasses and illustrated by a top notch artist. wotf009
(2014) V31 Q1 – R
(2018) V35 Q3 – HM
(2019) V36 Q3 – HM
(2019) V36 Q4 – SHM
(2020) V37 Q1 – ?

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby oishisushi911 » Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:28 am

Answers to Cover Letter Assignment
How can a cover letter actually hurt your chances to sell? It can give a first reader or editor a negative view on your story before they even start reading your story. First sentence skimmed and buh-bye.

2. What are some of the most common mistakes in cover letters? Overwriting. Overselling. Fluff. Nonsense. Restating the obvious or what was already stated on the guidelines. Thinking people will read your essay.

3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting? Yes, it may even be the best option as it’s safe, neutral and accepted by all.

4. When are you permitted to use an editor’s first name? If you’ve communicated with the editor before and they signed their first name.

5. When only do you list educational degrees?
Only if it’s related to the story content. Like if the story is set in Japan, very briefly mention my study program and time living here. If it’s about teacher gang war, very briefly mention my educational background in teaching and work experience assaulting opposing school chains.

6. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor? No, never. In the unlikely case that the guidelines have specifically requested a summary then provide one, but otherwise no. You’re not selling a novel, bub. Do mention genre and word count if you like or if it appears helpful, but do not summarize the story.

7. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor? Nah.

8. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor? Bad idea.

9. Will listing non-paying or token markets impress an editor? No! Might be worse than having no experience.

10. If we have many credits, should we list them all? What’s a good average that won’t overwhelm an editor’s tired eyes? (Yes, I exceeded this.
Like the Pirate's Code, they're more like guidelines.) 3 is best. If you have more, write “and others.” If you want to be a pirate, go with your gut and heave ho.

11. Finally, what do you feel is the number one rule about cover letters? Keep it short.

12. Finally finally. You have everything you need now to send your krakens out to sea. What are you waiting for? Hmm… fear? Laziness? Regret? Confusion? Exhaustion? Work? Excuses? Sure, all of the above. Will it stop me? Nah. Let’s do this.
R.J.K. Lee
2015-2019: 4 HMs, 9 Rs

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Peter Glen » Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:23 am

AVDutson wrote:So the question is, those of you working a day job 50+ hours a week, how do you schedule your writing time? How much time do you spend on the myriad activities that we HAVE to fit in? What tricks work best for you?


Hey Tony! Before my current situation (which is more flexible), I caught the first bus of the day into town and then set up writing with a coffee 7:00am to 8:15am then walked to work. Now, I don't have to commute but do drive my eldest into school when I set up with a coffee and write for an hour (aiming for around 700 words per coffee ;) before driving back home and going to work. Have come to the realisation that I need to set an additional daily session for learning (here), reading and editing. I also write whenever else I can fit it in :) HTH.
HM, R, R, R, R, HM

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Wulf Moon » Tue Nov 12, 2019 10:14 am

Peter Glen wrote:
AVDutson wrote:So the question is, those of you working a day job 50+ hours a week, how do you schedule your writing time? How much time do you spend on the myriad activities that we HAVE to fit in? What tricks work best for you?


Hey Tony! Before my current situation (which is more flexible), I caught the first bus of the day into town and then set up writing with a coffee 7:00am to 8:15am then walked to work. Now, I don't have to commute but do drive my eldest into school when I set up with a coffee and write for an hour (aiming for around 700 words per coffee ;) before driving back home and going to work. Have come to the realisation that I need to set an additional daily session for learning (here), reading and editing. I also write whenever else I can fit it in :) HTH.


Peter just listed one of my tips in the article "Never Let Go" in HOW I GOT PUBLISHED AND WHAT I LEARNED ALONG THE WAY. Remember it in the bullet points at the end (the epub didn't have bullets, but dashes)? Have a writing goal of 500 words a day. You'd be amazed what you can accomplish if you make that as solid in your life as eating dinner each night. Seven days equals 3500 words, and quite frankly, that's the size of stories you want to be writing as aspiring writers if you want to break into the more prestigious markets--you'll have a better chance as an unknown because the editor won't have to dedicate as much space to give you a shot. Not to restrict your style, just stating a reality. I was writing 17K stories all the time, because I'm a novelist disguising himself as a short story writer. And I got back a lot of great personal rejections saying great story, make it bigger and you'd sell this as a novel, but we simply don't have the room. FINALLY, after years submitting here and elsewhere, after Dave's semifinalist critique where he said to kill my darlings, I got the point and wrote smaller stories. The rest is history.

Okay, that was a sidebar. The point is set an acheivable DAILY goal that won't kill you. Make it as important as a daily meal. Make your family understand you have to do this. And watch the words add up. I like Peter's goal, because it employs two things: 1. Additional word count over 500 in case you need a day off in the week or have a bad day, and, 2. Sensory reward. In this case, a hot aromatic beverage with flavor and a stimulant. Melding that with your writing time? You're going to crave both because the experience becomes entwined with so many sensory inputs. It's a very good idea.

I use tea. I put on the tea kettle before I start my writing session and when the kettle screams, it's like a gun going off at the horse races. I'm ready to run. Kris Rusch uses this trick as well, and I learned it from her. You see, you can get so engaged in your writing, you forget to get up and stand. Tea forces you to get up, use the bathroom usually within the hour, ease pressure on your back, and gets your eyes focusing on distance instead of close. You have to protect your health if you want to be in this for the long haul. Sitting without getting up for long periods of time is really hard on the body.

Costco has that electronic adjustable height desk on sale right now, $100 off. I have a friend and WotF winner that uses that. Really saves his back.

All the beast,

Beastmaster Moon
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Retropianoplayer » Tue Nov 12, 2019 11:34 am

Adorably cute article by GIRL IN THE GLASSES. She's the one you want to keep your eyes on – she's a rising star in WOTF and most likely to win the GOLDEN PEN AWARD within three years.

Read Alex's article when it was first mentioned in the Forum.
NEXT: Please answer the following.

1. How can a cover letter actually hurt your chances to sell?

2. What are some of the most common mistakes in cover letters?

3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting?

4. When are you permitted to use an editor’s first name?

5. When only do you list educational degrees?

6. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?

7. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?

8. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?

9. Will listing non-paying or token markets impress an editor?

10. If we have many credits, should we list them all? What’s a good average that won’t overwhelm an editor’s tired eyes? (Yes, I exceeded this.
Like the Pirate's Code, they're more like guidelines.)

11. Finally, what do you feel is the number one rule about cover letters?


1. It might reveal to the Editor you're unprofessional, rude, boring, wasting his or her time, have unwarranted ego or anger-management issues.
2. Listing your entire life history, hopes, dreams, irrelevant trophies, grammar, or sending a synopsis of your story.
3. Yes.
4. If you've met him, and he or she says, "Hey so and so, just call me (insert first name)."
5. If they show professional aptitude with the theme of your story.
6. No.
7. A repeat of Question 6.
8. A repeat of Question 7. *This denotes triple importance of the sixty-four point bold font NO.
9. No, it will do the opposite.
10. Three top-selling markets.
11. Less is best.

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby AlexH » Tue Nov 12, 2019 12:31 pm

1. How can a cover letter actually hurt your chances to sell?
Bad formatting and writing anything other than straight-to-the-point.

2. What are some of the most common mistakes in cover letters?
Telling your life story. Listing non-paid or nominal pay publications when submitting to pro markets.

3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting?
Yes. Or "Dear Editors" if there are more than one. I've also seen pro markets suggest "Dear Market Name" as acceptable.

4. When are you permitted to use an editor’s first name?
Whenever you know the first name, particularly if it's listed on the website. If there are guest editors, it shows you're paying attention.

5. When only do you list educational degrees?
If it's relevant to your story e.g. you wrote a story about building a bridge to space and you have an engineering degree.

6. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
NO! Unless requested.

7. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
I don't think so.

8. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
Hmmmm. As you're asking so much - maybe I was wrong the first time.

I'm joking. My first answer stands. :)

9. Will listing non-paying or token markets impress an editor?
Only if you're submitting to non-paying or token markets.

10. If we have many credits, should we list them all? What’s a good average that won’t overwhelm an editor’s tired eyes? (Yes, I exceeded this.
Like the Pirate's Code, they're more like guidelines.)
A maximum of 3 publications, plus anything else like a Nebula nomination or self-penned anthology that sold a hundred thousand copies.

11. Finally, what do you feel is the number one rule about cover letters?
Keep it short and to the point.

12. Finally finally. You have everything you need now to send your krakens out to sea. What are you waiting for? Get kraken! wotf007
One final thing...I'm unsure about questions 6-8. I should always summarise my story, right? wotf001
35: R R R | 36: R HM R ?

Probably free for critique swaps, but double-check in case I'm away.
If you're a new writer and concerned about giving a critique, you're welcome to send me something anyway. :)

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby AjZach » Tue Nov 12, 2019 1:18 pm

My answers to cover letter assignment:

ASSIGNMENT:

Read Alex Shvartsman’s excellent article on cover letters (I work for him as podcast director at Future Science Fiction Digest). Here’s the link: https://alexshvartsman.com/2016/05/09/h ... er-letter/

NEXT: Please answer the following.

1. How can a cover letter actually hurt your chances to sell?
A bad cover letter can look unprofessional and let the reader know that you are new to the industry, your work is probably lower quality as a result. It gives the reader a preconceived notion of what they will see in your story.

2. What are some of the most common mistakes in cover letters?
Addressing the editors improperly, adding in additional contact info, summarizing your story and unnecessary biographical info.

3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting?
Yes. You are less likely to make a mistake with gender or spelling of their name.

4. When are you permitted to use an editor’s first name?
When they have signed a correspondence to you using that name.

5. When only do you list educational degrees?
When they apply directly to the content of the story.

6. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
No.

7. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
No

8. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
No.

9. Will listing non-paying or token markets impress an editor?
No, it looks like you can't write work at the level of their magazine, or have not tried to.

10. If we have many credits, should we list them all? What’s a good average that won’t overwhelm an editor’s tired eyes? (Yes, I exceeded this.
Like the Pirate's Code, they're more like guidelines.)
Only list a few of them.

11. Finally, what do you feel is the number one rule about cover letters?
Keep it short and simple. Do not put in anything beyond the bare minimum.

12. Finally finally. You have everything you need now to send your krakens out to sea. What are you waiting for? Get kraken! wotf007

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Henckel » Tue Nov 12, 2019 8:34 pm

ASSIGNMENT


1. How can a cover letter actually hurt your chances to sell?
If you lack the ability to write a proper cover letter, it’s fair to assume you can’t write your story well either. Editors will make paper airplanes of your cover letter and burn your story as an offering to the pagan god of literacy.

2. What are some of the most common mistakes in cover letters?
They go on and on about redundant crap.

3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting?
Yes. Which is good, because often we (humble submitters) don’t have the name of the person to submit to.

4. When are you permitted to use an editor’s first name?
(1) If it’s listed publicly (e.g. on the publisher’s website) (2) after they disclose it to you (3) when you’re a blood relation.

5. When only do you list educational degrees?
It’s a good idea if your story leans heavily on that degree and relevant subject matter. (though on the flip side, It’s not recommended to disclose your criminal record when writing crime fiction… unless it’s going to help you sell)

6. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
Normally, the answer is a flat “no”. However, there are the odd instances when the publisher specifically asks for a brief summary. Only in these few (rare) instances are we to summarize. And when we do, we must keep to their guidelines, lest they smite us with their digital “reject” button.

7. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
As above

8. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
As above

9. Will listing non-paying or token markets impress an editor?
Depends on which part of the body the list is tattooed. …and then the answer is till no.

10. If we have many credits, should we list them all? What’s a good average that won’t overwhelm an editor’s tired eyes?
Go for the big guns. Perhaps three.

11. Finally, what do you feel is the number one rule about cover letters?
Short and simple. (i.e. less than 5 foot 6 inches tall and have an IQ less than 70).

12. Finally finally. You have everything you need now to send your krakens out to sea. What are you waiting for? Get kraken!
We are the champions…. Of the world.
(2014) V31 Q1 – R
(2018) V35 Q3 – HM
(2019) V36 Q3 – HM
(2019) V36 Q4 – SHM
(2020) V37 Q1 – ?

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby AlexH » Wed Nov 13, 2019 3:27 am

AlexH wrote:3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting?
Yes. Or "Dear Editors" if there are more than one. I've also seen pro markets suggest "Dear Market Name" as acceptable.

I forgot to say I prefer the latter. Although many cover letters don't get read until a story is accepted, I feel I'm ignoring slush readers and everyone else by addressing a specific person or the chief editor. Or sometimes I sign off with something like "Thanks to everyone for their time and consideration." That's not the exact phrasing, but I can't remember off the top of my head.
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If you're a new writer and concerned about giving a critique, you're welcome to send me something anyway. :)

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby AVDutson » Wed Nov 13, 2019 3:46 am

Wulf Moon wrote:
Peter Glen wrote:
AVDutson wrote:So the question is, those of you working a day job 50+ hours a week, how do you schedule your writing time? How much time do you spend on the myriad activities that we HAVE to fit in? What tricks work best for you?


Hey Tony! Before my current situation (which is more flexible), I caught the first bus of the day into town and then set up writing with a coffee 7:00am to 8:15am then walked to work. Now, I don't have to commute but do drive my eldest into school when I set up with a coffee and write for an hour (aiming for around 700 words per coffee ;) before driving back home and going to work. Have come to the realisation that I need to set an additional daily session for learning (here), reading and editing. I also write whenever else I can fit it in :) HTH.


The point is set an acheivable DAILY goal that won't kill you. Make it as important as a daily meal. Make your family understand you have to do this. And watch the words add up. I like Peter's goal, because it employs two things: 1. Additional word count over 500 in case you need a day off in the week or have a bad day, and, 2. Sensory reward. In this case, a hot aromatic beverage with flavor and a stimulant. Melding that with your writing time? You're going to crave both because the experience becomes entwined with so many sensory inputs. It's a very good idea.

Beastmaster Moon


Excellent ideas! Thanks guys! I changed my 'process' during Q4 and was excited with the success--and know I know why.

I come home and turn on my laptop as I'm unpacking my lunchbox. For a while, I kept my laptop on the kitchen table, but I moved my desk closer to the door and turn it on as I come up the steps. No turning back now. I unpack my lunchbox and get something to nosh on and take it to my desk. So you're right Wulf, now my writing time is bliss!

I think what Peter hit on and Wulf has experienced first hand is scheduling. I've listened to several podcasts where authors talk about scheduling a set time for email, marketing, etc. I've never really scheduled anything other than 'writing time.' This has sometimes let me dawdle & daydream when I need to be focused. And the thing that's suffered the most is daily word count. If I'm editing, its all or nothing, but no NEW words get written. This has really concerned me in the past, but I wasn't sure how to overcome it.

I can't use a teapot (my writing time is 3-5am and everybody is still sleeping), but I do have these snazzy hourglasses I bought for writing sprints--a 30min & 15min. Now I just need to use them. I'll have to see how to divide these two hours, but I'm thinking 30min for Forum business (two or three times a week) and 30min for new word count (every day)(Take that, Stephen Cannell!).
~Tony
A.V. Dutson
R : 2, HM : 2, SHM : 2, F : 0, SF : 0, W : 0

"You know what I did after I wrote my first novel? I shut up and wrote twenty-three more."
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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby storysinger » Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:45 am

1. How can a cover letter actually hurt your chances to sell?
By letting the slush reader know from the start you are unprofessional in your approach to making a sale.

2. What are some of the most common mistakes in cover letters?
Too much information.

3. Is “Dear Editor” an acceptable greeting?
It is acceptable.

4. When are you permitted to use an editor’s first name?
When you have received an email with their first name being used. Or if you already know them.

5. When only do you list educational degrees?
When it shows familiarity with the content of your story.

6. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
No.

7. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
No.

8. Should you ever summarize your story for the editor?
Definitely not, unless it is requested.

9. Will listing non-paying or token markets impress an editor?
Not only will they be unimpressed, they may decline to read any further.

10. If we have many credits, should we list them all? What’s a good average that won’t overwhelm an editor’s tired eyes? (Yes, I exceeded this.
Like the Pirate's Code, they're more like guidelines.)
Three credits should be sufficient.

11. Finally, what do you feel is the number one rule about cover letters?
Follow the guidelines of the zine you are submitting to. Keep it simple.

12. Finally finally. You have everything you need now to send your krakens out to sea. What are you waiting for? Get kraken! wotf024
HM-V32/Q3
HM-V36/Q4
Today's science fiction is tomorrow's reality.
D.R.Sweeney

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Wulf Moon » Wed Nov 13, 2019 11:00 am

Tony: The key thing about planning daily writing time is creating a plan that's achievable and works for you. Reachable goals are key. So is dedication to the goal. You can add incentives, like coffee or a treat, to stimulate more desire for the activity. The ultimate end is to make a goal become HABIT.

Sounds like you are well on your way. Congrats! You have limited time this time of year, and yet you are finding a way. That kind of dedication will serve you very well.

One other thing to mention, and I learned this from a Golden Pen winnner from years ago. If possible, set your writing time at your peak Brainergy time. What's Brainergy? It's when your creative mind is firing on all eight. The fog has cleared, you can enter into the dream state, and your mind is at optimum efficiency to do its dance with words.

Morning people--I hate you--can wake up refreshed and envigorated from a night's sleep and string words together like magic tricks. Gene Wolfe started his fiction career by getting up very early before getting ready for his day job and doing his writing. Night owls do their writing after the kids have gone to bed and the house is quiet. Whenever your mind is firing away without fog and blue smoke and sputtering engine, that's when you write.

Find your Brainergy time. And write!

Good answers on cover letters, all! I don't comment on each one to reduce some of the volume of posts in here. But I read them all and enjoy seeing that you understand the points I've made. You are training for the Olympics, and I'm your coach. More training, more perfect practice! Write fresh, because it's writing, not editing, that counts toward your 500K to one million words. : )

All the beast!

Beastmaster Moon
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby RSchibler » Wed Nov 13, 2019 11:30 am

My cover letters are exactly two sentences long. Until this month, they were only the following:

Dear FIRST LAST,

Please consider my story "X" (Genre, word count) for publication in Y.

Thank you for your consideration,

Me

I have added: My short fiction will appear in the forthcoming "A Dying Planet" anthology from Flame Tree Press.

Two sentences. I take the time to look up the lead editor's name for each publication, and address it to them. I don't use Mr. Mrs. Or Ms. because frankly I don't know which is appropriate for each individual.

I have, in two cases, added an additional line. Once, when I wrote a story set on an Air Force aircraft, I mentioned I had my active duty and flight crew husband read it for me, and the other time, when it was based on a somewhat obscure Welsh myth. I don't think the latter sentence helped me, but the former may have as that story reached "held for consideration" status before being rejected.

They don't care who we are, they care what we wrote. (The same goes for query letters for agents, as well, although those have a slightly different structure and format).
V34: R, HM, R
V35: HM, R, R, HM
V36: R, HM, HM, SHM

ALWAYS available for critiques. PM me.

https://www.flametreepublishing.com/A-Dying-Planet-Short-Stories-ISBN-9781787557819.html

2020 Writers of the Future Superstars Scholarship recipient

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Wulf Moon » Wed Nov 13, 2019 12:52 pm

Since we're all running together here, and I want you to BELIEVE, I had a picture of a memory pop up on Facebook today. This is what I wrote about it:

"One year ago on this very day, I got the call from Joni Labaqi at Writers of the Future Contest that I was one of the eight finalists in the 4th quarter of the Volume 35 contest year. I was told to tell no one. I did not, which was not easy. But I did pour myself a glass of 1968 Glendronach to celebrate, and posted it here. At last, I had made finalist with "Super-Duper Moongirl and the Amazing Moon Dawdler." I wrote this story in a day and a half, 5,000 words of a 6,200 word story on the last day of the contest year. I knew when I submitted it four minutes before close on midnight that I had written my winner, and began writing my acceptance speech. Weird, I know. But I knew. This story was special."

Hoping for a similar experience for all of you! Keep writing! Keep sending!

Beastmaster Moon
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby AlexH » Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:10 pm

I'm having a go at sort-of freewriting for my second flash challenge this quarter. Most of it's coming out crap, so it'll be a lot easier to cut than my more considered attempts, which probably means it won't be as beneficial? I suppose I'm still writing words, which helps.
35: R R R | 36: R HM R ?

Probably free for critique swaps, but double-check in case I'm away.
If you're a new writer and concerned about giving a critique, you're welcome to send me something anyway. :)

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Location: Peoria, Arizona

Re: Moon's SUPER SECRET Bonus Challenge!

Postby Retropianoplayer » Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:14 pm

For all those science fiction buffs in the WOTF WULF PACK:

One night only. November 14th, 2019. Harkins Theaters brings THE TWILIGHT ZONE: A 60TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION to the big screen. Digitally restored versions of six quintessential episodes with an all-new documentary titled "Remembering Rod Serling" about the life, imagination and creativity of creator Serling.

I don't know how many states are presenting.

Noticed Northern Arizona, Southern Arizona, California, Colorado and Oklahoma. My list may be incomplete.

Best,

Retro


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