Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Open topics on the Contest itself, to include results-watch threads and other items of note.
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JVAshley
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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby JVAshley » Thu Sep 12, 2019 1:43 pm

AlexH wrote:How short was it*? My HM was under 1,400 words and has quite a dark ending (even though the PoV found what they were looking for). When I submitted, I thought it was my story least likely to get a HM.

*The word count isn't a big enough clue for any judges that might see this is it?


Just in case, I'll say it was in the same range as your HM. So, maybe I stand a chance at a possible HM. Thank You, AlexH. Now, I can begin twitching with a purpose.

I do enjoy a good pillow fort. wotf035
1x SF
3x HM
2x R

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AlexH
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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby AlexH » Thu Sep 12, 2019 2:00 pm

Great, I'm glad to be of service! My Q3 entry was actually even shorter than that. Though my Q4 will definitely be much longer.
35: R R R | 36: R HM R ?

Probably free for critique swaps, but double-check in case I'm away.
If you're a new writer and concerned about giving a critique, you're welcome to send me something anyway. :)

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Henckel
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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Henckel » Thu Sep 12, 2019 2:41 pm

Friends and neighbours, we are gathered here today to join our obsessive compulsive twitching habits in a holy cluster of facial tics.

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Peter Glen » Thu Sep 12, 2019 2:47 pm

Henckel wrote:Friends and neighbours, we are gathered here today to join our obsessive compulsive twitching habits in a holy cluster of facial tics.

I read that last word wrong for a second there wotf004 ... i think my glasses need glasses
HM 1, R 4

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Henckel
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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Henckel » Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:29 pm

Peter Glen wrote:
Henckel wrote:Friends and neighbours, we are gathered here today to join our obsessive compulsive twitching habits in a holy cluster of facial tics.

I read that last word wrong for a second there wotf004 ... i think my glasses need glasses


All good. It's just one of those terms you don't hear often.

I've done some volunteer work for the Tourette’s Association of New Zealand, so it’s a part of my daily lingo.

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby zeeteebeez » Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:54 pm

JVAshley wrote:
AlexH wrote:How short was it*? My HM was under 1,400 words and has quite a dark ending (even though the PoV found what they were looking for). When I submitted, I thought it was my story least likely to get a HM.

*The word count isn't a big enough clue for any judges that might see this is it?


Just in case, I'll say it was in the same range as your HM. So, maybe I stand a chance at a possible HM. Thank You, AlexH. Now, I can begin twitching with a purpose.

I do enjoy a good pillow fort. wotf035


Unless I'm mistaken, an HM essentially means your opening was promising enough to deserve a deeper look. So length probably doesn't have much to do with HM-ability.
Z.T.

Alternating HM's and R's

“It’s gonna seem so far. It’s gonna feel so hard. Until you want the work more than the reward. Do you want the work more than the reward?” - Jimmy Eat World

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby AlexH » Thu Sep 12, 2019 11:58 pm

zeeteebeez wrote:
JVAshley wrote:
AlexH wrote:How short was it*? My HM was under 1,400 words and has quite a dark ending (even though the PoV found what they were looking for). When I submitted, I thought it was my story least likely to get a HM.

*The word count isn't a big enough clue for any judges that might see this is it?


Just in case, I'll say it was in the same range as your HM. So, maybe I stand a chance at a possible HM. Thank You, AlexH. Now, I can begin twitching with a purpose.

I do enjoy a good pillow fort. wotf035


Unless I'm mistaken, an HM essentially means your opening was promising enough to deserve a deeper look. So length probably doesn't have much to do with HM-ability.

I do believe Mr. Farland has read them to the end though, which excites me: http://davidfarland.com/2017/05/got-honorable-mention/ wotf008

"First-passes" have been announced occasionally, which I think means the opening was promising. I got a first-pass, but it didn't turn into a HM.
35: R R R | 36: R HM R ?

Probably free for critique swaps, but double-check in case I'm away.
If you're a new writer and concerned about giving a critique, you're welcome to send me something anyway. :)

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby disgruntledpeony » Fri Sep 13, 2019 4:36 am

I can't bring myself to twitch on this one. I like the story I wrote, but I took some risks I think will end up hurting my chances. Don't know if it's actually a marketable story--it's just the one that latched on out of nowhere and wouldn't let go.
If a person offend you, and you are in doubt as to whether it was intentional or not, do not resort to extreme measures; simply watch your chance and hit him with a brick. ~ Mark Twain

R, SF, SHM, SHM, SHM, F, R, HM, SHM, R, HM, R, ?

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby RSchibler » Fri Sep 13, 2019 6:02 am

I tend to think that my most recent story is the best I've ever written, and they usually are, because I work so hard on each one to incorporate the lessons I've learned since writing the last. So I don't twitch as much as I used to, because I'm always placing my hopes on the NEXT story because it's obviously so much better. I always hope to at least earn an HM, which means my writing is meeting quality.
Trying to refute entropy with words.

Vol34: R, HM, R
Vol35: HM, R, R, HM
Vol36: R, HM, HM, pending

ALWAYS available for critiques. PM me.


https://www.flametreepublishing.com/A-Dying-Planet-Short-Stories-ISBN-9781787557819.html

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Wulf Moon » Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:40 am

AlexH wrote:
zeeteebeez wrote:
JVAshley wrote:
Just in case, I'll say it was in the same range as your HM. So, maybe I stand a chance at a possible HM. Thank You, AlexH. Now, I can begin twitching with a purpose.

I do enjoy a good pillow fort. wotf035


Unless I'm mistaken, an HM essentially means your opening was promising enough to deserve a deeper look. So length probably doesn't have much to do with HM-ability.

I do believe Mr. Farland has read them to the end though, which excites me: http://davidfarland.com/2017/05/got-honorable-mention/ wotf008

"First-passes" have been announced occasionally, which I think means the opening was promising. I got a first-pass, but it didn't turn into a HM.


Heh, thanks for sharing this link to Dave's tips, Alex. You shared one where I do believe Dave talked about my entry for that quarter, and my heart sunk when I read it back then. You see, I had gotten to the point with the contest that I felt I had to throw curve balls in order to win, things so out of the ordinary that if successful, they would catch Dave's eye as being totally unique and propel my story to the top. I started writing a lot of experimental pieces in all spec fic genres, and they all placed at various levels. In this quarter, I wrote a story in first person. I withheld the fact that the good guy had been turned until the shocking reveal at the very end. I told it in a very literary style, rich with descriptive language and a historical setting. I certainly felt it worked. And then, Dave wrote his piece as he was judging. I can't say for certain he wrote about my story, but that story hit every one of his markers. In my heart, I still believe he was talking about my entry. Here's what he wrote:

"The story may have plotting problems. Very often I’ll have a story whose concept is good and the writing is beautiful, but the plot just doesn’t work. Usually it has a good opening (that’s why I got hooked), but perhaps the middle of the story is weak, or the ending doesn’t quite pan out. I got a beautiful story last week, told in first-person. But the plot only worked because the author withheld information from the reader. Does the story work? Well, only if you don’t think about it too much. The author’s style and tone were exceptional in many ways, but I’m not sure that it should win the contest. I wasn’t even sure if it should be a finalist. So when plotting your story, make certain that its plot is logical, that it builds with each try-fail cycle, and that you have a powerful ending that leaves the reader thinking and emotionally moved."

For Dave, if he was talking about my story, it was well written, but failed. I thought it worked, he did not. But I didn't leave it there. If you look over in my SUPER SECRETS topic, we recently did an exercise called KILL YOUR DARLINGS. Well, this was one of those stories I applied the exercise to. I took that 10,000 word story, gutted it down to the essential scenes, deleted the others, and kept my good guy...well...good! Three thousand words when I was done. And I sent the story to a pro paying anthology from Third Flatiron and sold it. That story? "War Dog." It went on to win Critters Readers Choice award for Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Short Story of 2018. Over two thousand people from around the world voted in those awards. They liked my revised story.

Did I make a mistake throwing Dave a curve ball? No. He loves original ideas, and if you can execute one truly original idea perfectly, you will win this contest. Did I make a mistake starting a story in first person in historical fantasy, only to make it what I would define as surrealistic horror by the end? Probably. I took it that Dave said as much, tossed my trick ending, but kept the original idea and much of its execution. And it sold. I did this also with another story where I had Dave's critique from a semifinalist where he told me to "kill my darlings." And that story was just published in DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019.

Why bring this up? No reason, except you quoted one of Dave's blogs that felt like he was writing about me, and it had great impact on one of my stories. I do believe if you get advice from a bestselling writer of Dave's caliber, and listen to it, you can see your weak spots and craft a story that hits the professional mark, instead of just missing it. It's also why I encourage all to try to get to one of Dave's classes, or do some of his online courses, or go see him and learn from him at the Superstars Writing Seminar. Dave was trained by the best, Algis Budrys. He knows what he's talking about.

That's the kind of writer you should be learning from. And if you can't afford any of that, guess what? It's okay. Author Services at this very moment is working on bringing you online classes on how to write a winning short story from David Farland, Tim Powers, and more. Stay tuned!

All the beast!

Wulf Moon
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Retropianoplayer » Fri Sep 13, 2019 1:56 pm

It's tough to judge, and to be a judge.

The very name implies absolute fairness, absolute impartiality, absolute integrity and certainly no bias.

When I lived back in New York State, I was a Forensics Judge. One time, I judged the All-State New York Championships. The absolute best feeling I had was listening to the complete presentation of the debaters, to the point of fanaticism and writing down the word-flow charts for EVERY SINGLE DEBATER.
I had a checklist which ran off points, I tallied each contestant's scores, and in each single case, I provided feedback on strengths and weaknesses of their presentation. More than once, a losing team went over to me after the tallies were in and told me, "When we knew you were our judge, we knew you were absolutely fair and gave us a fair hearing."

That is true. It didn't matter whether my viewpoint was one hundred eighty degrees against the politics of the debater, if their argument was strong, convincing, and without ad hominem attacks on the opposite team, I gave them high scores. So much so that the organizers of the championships consistently told me, "You're moving too slow. We need to get to the next round."

I didn't care. I felt that each contestant's hopes rode on their presentation, and I would listen completely to each entire debate, as I know they would do if I were debating. P.S. I was one of very few Judges who wore sport jacket, white shirt, tie and pants to the debate, but I felt the students deserved that.

It must be extremely demanding to be a judge for this international contest. I can't even imagine.

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Henckel » Fri Sep 13, 2019 2:32 pm

Wulf, you mentioned your story in deep magic magazine. I'm about half way through reading it. The story is spectacular! ... I'm not just saying that to be nice. The story (thus far) truely goes above and beyond mere awesomeness.

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby WillShadbolt » Fri Sep 13, 2019 3:00 pm

disgruntledpeony wrote:I can't bring myself to twitch on this one. I like the story I wrote, but I took some risks I think will end up hurting my chances. Don't know if it's actually a marketable story--it's just the one that latched on out of nowhere and wouldn't let go.


I'm in the same boat as you. I think the idea behind it is pretty original (at least I haven't heard of it being done anywhere else), but it pretty much required me to rather shallow characters. I'm still hoping for an HM, but I don't think I'll get it. Oh well, it's a story I'm really glad I wrote, both because it was a big learning opportunity and because it was fun to write, which I guess it the most important thing.

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Wulf Moon » Fri Sep 13, 2019 4:50 pm

Henckel wrote:Wulf, you mentioned your story in deep magic magazine. I'm about half way through reading it. The story is spectacular! ... I'm not just saying that to be nice. The story (thus far) truely goes above and beyond mere awesomeness.


Thanks so much, Christopher! It's gotten two wonderful reviews on Amazon so far--one from their first reader saying it was his fave of the lot! Really glad you are enjoying it. They didn't send galleys--most do--and I found over thirty formatting issues (mostly spacing issues after italics) today when I had a moment to read my copy. Eeeek! Trust me, those were not in the original manuscript, and I just finished pointing them out so they can get them cleaned up. Please forgive those errors--the copyeditor normally catches them before publication. And the title is "Weep No More for the Willow." Not, "Weep No More for the Willows." The editor got it right in his intro--don't know how it went wrong elsewhere, but stuff happens!

Retropianoplayer, very cool about your debate judging. I had a few from one school that were not so fair, only interested in lowballing us to advance their team. They were well known for it, too. That same judge said I couldn't have written the original story I read for forensics, and called me out before the entire group that I must have copied it from somewhere (not true, and my coach had it out with her!). So I do appreciate honest, faithful judges that uphold the dignity and integrity of their office! Well done!

Q3 results should be coming soon. Hang in there and go write your magnificent Q4!

All the beast!

Wulf Moon
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Retropianoplayer » Fri Sep 13, 2019 6:07 pm

Thank you, Wulf.

That aberrant Judge during your Forensic experience had no right to make an accusation of that nature – it was not his place to contest the authenticity of your composition. In fact, he should have assumed the presumption of regularity, and it should have been completely irrelevant and immaterial whether his school won points or lost. The entire debate process is about merit, persuasiveness, strength of argument, skillful cross-examination tactics.
For the most part, I judged Lincoln-Douglas, and occasionally, Public Forum. I was not paid for any of this – strictly voluntary basis on a Saturday from 6 A.M. to about 6 P.M. I did this because I felt I owed the service to my high school alma mater and an English instructor there (name withheld) whose credentials are nationally recognized.

The first story I read in Volume 35 Anthology was, of course, yours. I've said it before, I'll say it again – the strongest first-person tense I've ever read in science fiction, and it's difficult to imagine a more flawed, sympathetic protagonist, with a total command of emotional elements (you can turn the tears on and off at will) than your story. Double kudos to the narrative of a twelve-year-old tween combined with real-world knowledge of social media gadgetry. I will now move on to the other stories.

Best,
Barry

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Wulf Moon » Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:41 pm

Retropianoplayer wrote:Thank you, Wulf....

The first story I read in Volume 35 Anthology was, of course, yours. I've said it before, I'll say it again – the strongest first-person tense I've ever read in science fiction, and it's difficult to imagine a more flawed, sympathetic protagonist, with a total command of emotional elements (you can turn the tears on and off at will) than your story. Double kudos to the narrative of a twelve-year-old tween combined with real-world knowledge of social media gadgetry. I will now move on to the other stories.

Best,
Barry


___________________

Very kind. Thank you, Barry. About that tears trick, I was doing something inherently in that story that I didn't know was actually the right way to do it. I just sensed it was right, to bring Dixie up to the point of tears, but never show her crying, never have her admit she cried. And many months later, at the WotF workshop, Orson Scott Card taught us you never want your protagonist to cry, because then your reader won't have to. If you bring the protagonist up to the point of tears, but don't show it, then your reader will cry for them.

It was a fascinating point. And I was happy I had done it right.

So there's a tip from the workshop for all. Use it wisely. : )

All the beast,

Wulf Moon
Wulf Moon http://driftweave.com
Q4 Vol 35 "Super-Duper Moongirl..."
Critters Readers Award: #1, "War Dog," Best SF&F Short Story of 2018
NEW! "Weep No More..." DEEP MAGIC Fall 2019 http://amazon.com/author/wulfmoon

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Eagerink » Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:19 am

"Orson Scott Card taught us you never want your protagonist to cry, because then your reader won't have to."

That's an interesting point Wulf. I have noticed that while reading and writing but never thought of it in words that way. Thanks for the tip!
wotf045

R~1
HM~2

...But one man's soul it hath broken,
A light that doth not depart;
and his look, or a word he hath spoken,
Wrought flame in another man's heart...
-O'Shaughnessy

wotf047

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby storysinger » Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:42 am

Eagerink wrote:"Orson Scott Card taught us you never want your protagonist to cry, because then your reader won't have to."


Good stuff there. I will definitely keep it in mind.
HM-1
Today's science fiction is tomorrow's reality.
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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby glenn84 » Sat Sep 14, 2019 11:18 am

Eagerink wrote:"Orson Scott Card taught us you never want your protagonist to cry, because then your reader won't have to."

That's an interesting point Wulf. I have noticed that while reading and writing but never thought of it in words that way. Thanks for the tip!


I have nothing but the utmost respect for Orson Scott Card (Ender's Game did get me to write after all). But I have to disagree with him on this point. I've read scenes in stories where the protagonist cries and in no way did they negatively affect the emotional impact. I feel like the protagonist wouldn't be likeable if he didn't show some kind of emotion to a sad event-- like watching their son die for example. In fact, I believe the opposite. I believe if a character doesn't show emotion in a highly emotional scene than that character is no longer a protagonist in my eyes. He's become something else entirely. He's either a anti-hero or an antagonist at that point.
HM x 7
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R - unknown

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby RSchibler » Sat Sep 14, 2019 2:55 pm

glenn84 wrote:
Eagerink wrote:"Orson Scott Card taught us you never want your protagonist to cry, because then your reader won't have to."

That's an interesting point Wulf. I have noticed that while reading and writing but never thought of it in words that way. Thanks for the tip!


I have nothing but the utmost respect for Orson Scott Card (Ender's Game did get me to write after all). But I have to disagree with him on this point. I've read scenes in stories where the protagonist cries and in no way did they negatively affect the emotional impact. I feel like the protagonist wouldn't be likeable if he didn't show some kind of emotion to a sad event-- like watching their son die for example. In fact, I believe the opposite. I believe if a character doesn't show emotion in a highly emotional scene than that character is no longer a protagonist in my eyes. He's become something else entirely. He's either a anti-hero or an antagonist at that point.


I think the idea is to more take your character to the brink of tears and then not show it, leaving the emotional resolution in the mind of the reader. Make it clear that the character would cry, but don't show it. The human brain likes to carry things to their natural conclusion, and it draws the reader in emotionally.
Trying to refute entropy with words.

Vol34: R, HM, R
Vol35: HM, R, R, HM
Vol36: R, HM, HM, pending

ALWAYS available for critiques. PM me.


https://www.flametreepublishing.com/A-Dying-Planet-Short-Stories-ISBN-9781787557819.html

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby glenn84 » Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:08 pm

RSchibler wrote:
glenn84 wrote:
Eagerink wrote:"Orson Scott Card taught us you never want your protagonist to cry, because then your reader won't have to."

That's an interesting point Wulf. I have noticed that while reading and writing but never thought of it in words that way. Thanks for the tip!


I have nothing but the utmost respect for Orson Scott Card (Ender's Game did get me to write after all). But I have to disagree with him on this point. I've read scenes in stories where the protagonist cries and in no way did they negatively affect the emotional impact. I feel like the protagonist wouldn't be likeable if he didn't show some kind of emotion to a sad event-- like watching their son die for example. In fact, I believe the opposite. I believe if a character doesn't show emotion in a highly emotional scene than that character is no longer a protagonist in my eyes. He's become something else entirely. He's either a anti-hero or an antagonist at that point.


I think the idea is to more take your character to the brink of tears and then not show it, leaving the emotional resolution in the mind of the reader. Make it clear that the character would cry, but don't show it. The human brain likes to carry things to their natural conclusion, and it draws the reader in emotionally.


That would definitely work. But I think showing the moment the character cries in conjunction with the reader shedding a tear would be even more powerful, in my opinion.
HM x 7
SHM x 1
R - unknown

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Henckel » Sun Sep 15, 2019 7:44 pm

Wulf Moon wrote: Orson Scott Card taught us you never want your protagonist to cry, because then your reader won't have to. If you bring the protagonist up to the point of tears, but don't show it, then your reader will cry for them.


I remember hearing this lesson on a Writing Excuses podcast too. ...

I did something similar with my on my q4 submission, I withheld mc's tears until the 3/4 mark: the point of her total irreparable inner meltdown. Had to turn on the waterworks to let readers know we've reached the hear of the matter and too set up the climax by cutting straight into her vulnerability.

.... so much happiness here!!!

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby RSchibler » Fri Sep 20, 2019 9:13 am

Dave's newsletter definitely peeped today. Good luck to all!
Trying to refute entropy with words.

Vol34: R, HM, R
Vol35: HM, R, R, HM
Vol36: R, HM, HM, pending

ALWAYS available for critiques. PM me.


https://www.flametreepublishing.com/A-Dying-Planet-Short-Stories-ISBN-9781787557819.html

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby AlexH » Fri Sep 20, 2019 10:02 am

Yep, and someone has a great critique from Dave if they read the newsletter. Hopefully, they do! https://mystorydoctor.com/avoiding-clutter/
35: R R R | 36: R HM R ?

Probably free for critique swaps, but double-check in case I'm away.
If you're a new writer and concerned about giving a critique, you're welcome to send me something anyway. :)

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby Eagerink » Fri Sep 20, 2019 11:35 am

RSchibler wrote:Dave's newsletter definitely peeped today. Good luck to all!


Definitely! :)

As a random point, several of his articles talk about putting a hook in the first sentence, two pages, etc. - but I keep wondering if when he says something should be done in the first two pages if he means as they are regularly, or when they are double spaced? haha wotf022
wotf045

R~1
HM~2

...But one man's soul it hath broken,
A light that doth not depart;
and his look, or a word he hath spoken,
Wrought flame in another man's heart...
-O'Shaughnessy

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby disgruntledpeony » Fri Sep 20, 2019 12:02 pm

Eagerink wrote:
RSchibler wrote:Dave's newsletter definitely peeped today. Good luck to all!


Definitely! :)

As a random point, several of his articles talk about putting a hook in the first sentence, two pages, etc. - but I keep wondering if when he says something should be done in the first two pages if he means as they are regularly, or when they are double spaced? haha wotf022


wotf019 I'd assume double-spaced, but that's just an assumption. (I'm a bit biased; I write double-spaced.)

*sets up pillow fort, passes out hot chocolate, battens down hatches*
If a person offend you, and you are in doubt as to whether it was intentional or not, do not resort to extreme measures; simply watch your chance and hit him with a brick. ~ Mark Twain

R, SF, SHM, SHM, SHM, F, R, HM, SHM, R, HM, R, ?

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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby storysinger » Fri Sep 20, 2019 12:19 pm

Eagerink wrote:As a random point, several of his articles talk about putting a hook in the first sentence, two pages, etc. - but I keep wondering if when he says something should be done in the first two pages if he means as they are regularly, or when they are double spaced? haha

What an interesting viewpoint. That really shortens the impact of the beginning of a story.
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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby JVAshley » Fri Sep 20, 2019 12:48 pm

disgruntledpeony wrote: wotf019 I'd assume double-spaced, but that's just an assumption. (I'm a bit biased; I write double-spaced.)

*sets up pillow fort, passes out hot chocolate, battens down hatches*

*Ducks into pillow fort with plate full of brownies* wotf018
Is brownies with hot chocolate too much chocolate, peony?
If so, I'll go back for sugar cookies, but it's getting scary out there. wotf005
1x SF
3x HM
2x R

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disgruntledpeony
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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby disgruntledpeony » Fri Sep 20, 2019 12:49 pm

JVAshley wrote:
disgruntledpeony wrote: wotf019 I'd assume double-spaced, but that's just an assumption. (I'm a bit biased; I write double-spaced.)

*sets up pillow fort, passes out hot chocolate, battens down hatches*

*Ducks into pillow fort with plate full of brownies* wotf018
Is brownies with hot chocolate too much chocolate, peony?
If so, I'll go back for sugar cookies, but it's getting scary out there. wotf005

I'll accept your invitation of brownies, but I feel it important to state that the best ice cream I've ever had was essentially Death by Chocolate. I can never have enough chocolate (unless it's higher than 70% dark, because anything above that tastes too bitter for me). wotf019
If a person offend you, and you are in doubt as to whether it was intentional or not, do not resort to extreme measures; simply watch your chance and hit him with a brick. ~ Mark Twain

R, SF, SHM, SHM, SHM, F, R, HM, SHM, R, HM, R, ?

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reigheena
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Re: Discussion: Q3 Volume 36

Postby reigheena » Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:11 pm

*Brings the marshmallows* Well, my last submission was disqualified due to me forgetting to delete the byline from the manuscript. Can't get worse than that, right? ;)
Silver Honorable Mention: 3
Honorable Mentions: 7. Published HM - Infant Insomnia
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